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Department of Arts and Sciences Courses and Descriptions

APOL, BIO, FORM, HIST, PHIL 3610 Directed Study

This course is designed to offer the student the opportunity to add Arts and Sciences elective hours to a program or course. This course will follow the regular academic calendar and requires pre-approval from the course instructor. The instructor will determine the subject and requirements.

Apologetics Courses

APOL2130 Introduction to Apologetics – 3 hours

A study of the defense of the Christian faith. Topics discussed will include apologetic methodology, arguments for God’s existence, miracles, evidence for the deity and resurrection of Jesus, and responses to several major objections to the Christian faith.

APOL3431 Apologetics and Other Faiths – 3 hours

A theological and apologetic critique of the major world religions and pseudo-Christian cults, including Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Roman Catholicism, Latter Day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, the New Age Movement, and others.

APOL3530 Apologetics and the Bible – 3 hours

A study and defense of the historical reliability, inerrancy, and divine authority of the Bible. The course will focus on giving responses to major objections to the reliability and authority of the Bible, including the challenge of contemporary historical Jesus research.

APOL4631 Special Topics in Apologetics – 3 hours

A concentrated study of a selected topic or person related to Christian apologetics (Prerequisites may apply).

Biology Courses

BIO2130 Anatomy and Physiology – 3 hours

This course involves a study of organ systems and general anatomy, including a basic study of human anatomy and physiology. (Corequisite: BIO2110L)

BIO2110L Anatomy and Physiology Lab – 1 hour

This laboratory course explores anatomical structures in animal and human systems. The cellular makeup and the physiology of body systems are examined. Dissections (real or virtual) are used to enhance the understanding of body systems. Lab exercises typically take 1 ½ to 2 hours.

BIO2230 Cell and Molecular Biology – 3 hours

This course involves a study of the molecular and cellular components of living things, integrating principles of biology common to all living things. Emphasis will be given to the issue of molecular origins. (Corequisite: BIO2210L)

BIO2210L Cell and Molecular Biology Lab – 1 hour

This laboratory course explores the cellular and molecular structures and functions of living things. Biochemical and genetic processes are examined. Laboratory exercises (real or virtual) are used to enhance the understanding of cell activities. Lab exercises typically take 1 ½ to 2 hours.

BIO2630 Taxonomic Survey of Organisms – 3 hours

This course involves a study of the broad array of living organisms, concentrating on their current taxonomic classification, relational characteristics, and ecological space occupied. The course will explore the evolutionary explanation for the origin of organisms. (Corequisite: BIO2610L)

BIO2610L Taxonomic Survey of Organisms Lab – 1 hour

This laboratory course will involve two or more field trips to museums, zoos, botanical gardens, and aquariums. The field trips will require at least two full days to accomplish the trips and assigned tasks. (The student must check with the instructor before enrolling in the class for the dates for the field trips so that there are no schedule conflicts.)

BIO4630 Molecular Biology – 3 hours

This course covers the molecular functions and products of the cell. Emphasis is given to DNA structure and function, gene structure and function, regulation of transcription and translation, and synthesis of macromolecules. (Prerequisite: CHM3630 Biochemistry or permission of Instructor)

Chemistry Courses

CHM2630 Inorganic Chemistry – 3 hours

This is a survey course covering general chemistry. Emphasis is given to the facts, principles, and theories of general chemistry including math operations, matter and energy, atomic structure, symbols and formulas, nomenclature, the periodic table, bonding concepts, equations, reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, phases of matter, solutions, pH and equilibrium reactions. (Corequisite: CHM2610L)

CHM2610L Inorganic Chemistry Lab – 1 hour

This laboratory class explores matter and its composition, structure, and reactions. Laboratory exercises enhance the understanding of atomic and molecular activities. Lab exercises typically take two to three hours.

CHM3630 Biochemistry – 3 hours

This course covers the chemistry common to living organisms. Emphasis is given to the structure and function of biomolecules including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides; structure and function of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids; metabolism, bioenergetics and regulatory mechanisms. (Prerequisite CHM2630 or permission of instructor)

Computer Course

CIS1330 Introduction to Computers – 3 hours

This course is designed to orient students to PC-compatible computers. The course includes a study of basic computer hardware, MS Windows with command prompt commands, word processing software, and an introduction to spreadsheet software.

English Courses

ENG0300 English Review – No Credit

This course is required for students whose scores on a placement test indicate a need for further study of English grammar and basic writing. These students must take this course as a prerequisite for ENG1330 and ENG1331. This course has a writing lab requirement.

ENG1330 English Composition 1 – 3 hours

Designed to develop skills in composition and in critical reading, this course will concentrate on writing as a tool of thought.  Essays based on experience, reflection, rhetorical analysis, and exploratory argumentation will give opportunities for students to develop their composition skills.  Assignments will enable students to use the computer to conduct research, to prepare documents, and to provide accurate citations.  Emphasis will be placed upon learning how to improve writing through revision.  

ENG1331 English Composition 2 – 3 hours

This course is designed to develop skills in reading, analyzing, and writing arguments, including writing from research.  Students learn how to follow a prescribed style manual for documentation and how to avoid plagiarism. (Prerequisite:  Eng1330 English Comp 1)

ENG2430 English Literature 1 – 3 hours

A survey of British Literature from the Fifth Century to the early Romantic Period.  Attention is given to the artistry of the major authors’ works, the manner in which they reflect and respond to contemporaneous events and ideas, and how Christians can thoughtfully respond to these works.  (Prerequisites:  ENG1330 and ENG1331)

ENG2530 English Literature 2 – 3 hours

A survey of British Literature from the early Romantic Period to the present.  Attention is given to the artistry of the major authors’ works, the manner in which they reflect and respond to contemporaneous events and ideas, and how Christians can thoughtfully respond to these works. (Prerequisites:  ENG1330 and ENG1331)

ENG3430 American Literature 1 – 3 hours

A survey of American Literature from the Colonial era to the Civil War.  Attention is given to the artistry of the major authors’ works, the manner in which they reflect and respond to contemporaneous events and ideas, and how Christians can thoughtfully respond to these works.  (Prerequisites:  ENG1330 and ENG1331)

ENG3530 American Literature 2 – 3 hours

A survey of American Literature from the Civil War to the present.  Attention is given to the artistry of the major authors’ works, the manner in which they reflect and respond to contemporaneous events and ideas, and how Christians can thoughtfully respond to these works.  (Prerequisites: ENG1330, ENG1331)

Formation Courses

FORM1230 Christian Traditions – 3 hours

A survey mapping the emergence of confessions, worship, and organizational structures of the major traditions within Christianity, with particular attention given to the various Christian bodies that arose from the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century.

FORM2731 Spiritual Formation through the Arts – 3 hours

This course will explore the natural connections between spiritual formation and the arts. Various mediums of art and how they have supported growth towards Christ-likeness will be studied and experienced. This course will research the understanding of how the arts can strengthen one’s personal relationship with Christ as well how the arts have been used throughout church history to enhance teaching and training.

FORM3220 Faith and Learning – 2 hours

This course is designed to help students self-identify their own Christian framework. Both structure and content will facilitate opportunities for students to create a reflective portrait of their current Christian beliefs and experiences, with a view to learning the intellectual and practical histories of such commitments.  Time will be devoted to looking back at their SEBC experiences and looking forward in terms of the skills, habits, and demeanor that represent a responsible Christian worldview.

Health Course

HLTH1110 Personal Fitness – 1 hour

Explores all of the components of health-related fitness. These include cardio-respiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. The course examines exercise and nutrition from a biblical standpoint, specifically the dietary code for healthy living. (Meets for 2 class hours weekly)

History Courses

HIST2130 Western Civilization 1 – 3 hours

A survey of significant events, persons, ideas, and movements in Western history in the ancient and medieval periods.

HIST2230 Western Civilization 2 – 3 hours

A survey of significant events, persons, ideas, and movements in Western history in the early modern and modern periods.

HIST2234 United States History to 1877 – 3 hours

A survey tracking the development of US history from its colonial roots to the end of Reconstruction and emphasizing significant persons and events that shaped American culture.

HIST3134 Ancient Christianity – 3 hours

A survey tracing Christianity’s history from its emergence within Judaism through the papacy of Gregory I (590-604) with an emphasis upon leading persons, events, and movements.

HIST3234 Modern European Christianity – 3 hours

A survey tracing Christianity’s history from the Protestant Reformation to the present that highlights the Reformation, Counter Reformation, modern religious liberalism, and the development of twentieth century religious pluralism.

HIST4133 Christianity in America – 3 hours

A survey of Christianity’s history in America beginning with European colonization that highlights significant themes, events, leaders, and places special emphasis upon the development, dominance, and post-Civil War erosion of evangelical Protestantism’s hegemony in the United States.

HIST4233 Special Topics in History – 3 hours

A concentrated study of a selected person, event, or movement within the history of Western civilization.

Math Courses

MTH1231 College Math – 3 hours

Designed for those working toward teacher certification in Elementary Education or as an elective in any other program. It presumes little prior knowledge of mathematics and is presented in a semi-programmed work text format that allows students to proceed at one’s own pace.

MTH2131 College Algebra – 3 hours

Taught in a discussion and demonstration format, this course covers variables, linear and polynomial equations, and graphing. (Prerequisite: MTH1231 or permission of instructor)

MTH2231 Geometry – 3 hours

Designed for those working toward teacher certification in Elementary Education or as an elective in any other program. Taught in a discussion and demonstration format that covers geometric proofs, right triangles, and areas of geometric figures. (Prerequisite: MTH1231 or permission of instructor)

Orientation Courses

ORI1310 Study Skills – 1 hour

This is a foundational course designed as a review of basic study methods, learning styles, and research skills. (This course is required for those on academic warning. Other students not required to take this course must get permission from their advisor before enrolling in the course.)

 ORIO301 College Life Skills – No Credit

A 1-hour noncredit required course for all first-time SEBC students. The course must be completed during the student’s first semester and passed within the first year of attendance. The purpose of the course is to enhance learning, personal growth, satisfaction and retention of students new to the College by giving them the tools they need to succeed and graduate from our institution.

Philosophy Courses

PHIL2430 Logic and Critical Thinking – 3 hours

A study of the methods and principles of sound reasoning. The course will discuss the nature of arguments and how to evaluate them. Topics will be covered such as deduction and induction, quantification theory, fallacies, and procedures for testing validity.

PHIL2530 Worldviews – 3 hours

A survey of the major worldviews that will explore their perspectives on human nature, meaning, and value, as well as their contemporary cultural and religious expressions.

PHIL3131 Introduction to Philosophy – 3 hours

A general survey of major philosophical issues with evaluation from a Christian perspective. Topics discussed may include the nature of philosophy, the existence of God, the mind/body problem, free will and determinism, the theory of knowledge, and ethics.

PHIL3135 Introduction to Ethics – 3 hours

A study and evaluation of various ethical systems from a Christian perspective, and the application of a Christian system of ethics to important moral issues.

PHIL3531 History of Philosophy 1: Ancient and Medieval – 3 hours

A survey of the major philosophers and their ideas from the Ancient Greek period to the Medieval period. Attention will be given to the historical interaction between philosophy and the Christian faith.

PHIL3532 History of Philosophy 2: Modern and Contemporary – 3 hours

A survey of the major philosophers and their ideas from the Modern period to the present. Attention will be given to the historical interaction between philosophy and the Christian faith.

PHIL4632 Special Topics in Philosophy – 3 hours

A concentrated study of a selected topic or person in the field of philosophy. (Prerequisites may apply)

Physical Education Courses

PHED1510 Recreational Activities – 1 hour

Designed to develop skills in various recreational activities. These activities may include racquetball, pickle ball, badminton, tennis, golf, or other options. (Meets 2 class hours weekly)

PHED1511 Team Sports – 1 hour

Introduces students to rules and basic skills involved in team sports. (Meets for 2 class hours weekly)

PHED1512 Individual Sports – 1 hour

A course designed to introduce students to rules and basic skills involved in individual sports. (Meets for 2 class hours weekly)

Psychology Courses

PSY2132 General Psychology – 3 hours

A general introduction to the science of psychology, which studies human motives, thinking, emotions, and actions, along with the general assumptions and teachings about the nature of man.

PSY2232 Human Growth and Development – 3 hours

A study of the developmental processes from birth to death. Special emphasis will be given to the growth and development of the elementary school child in the biophysical, psychosocial, cognitive and spiritual domains. (Prerequisite: PSY2132)

PSY4421 Abnormal Psychology – 2 hours

A study of disorganized personalities. This course examines some of the most common mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders that interfere with personal independence. (Prerequisite: PSY2132)

Science – Physical Courses

SCI1131 Physical Science: Chemistry and Geology – 3 hours

This course involves a study of basic physical science principles, emphasizing chemistry and geology. This course includes a study of geological formations.

SCI1231 Physical Science: Astronomy and Physics – 3 hours

This course involves a study of basic physical science principles, emphasizing physics and astronomy. This course includes telescopic observations and may require evening classes. (Prerequisite: MTH2131 Algebra or MTH2231 Geometry or by permission of instructor)

Speech Courses

SPCH1331 Oral Communication – 3 hours

The basic aim of this course is the development of public speaking skills. Stress is placed upon speaker confidence, vocal clarity, verbal pace, body language, outline formulation, and the reduction of detracting mannerisms. Special emphasis is also given to interpretive Bible reading and to beginning skills related to teaching, preaching, and interpersonal communication.